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1000 Pound State Record Alligator
caught in Alabama!!
 
A family in Alabama are celebrating after catching the largest alligator ever recorded in the state over the weekend. The mammoth beast, which measured 15-feet long and weighed 1,011.5 pounds, was captured by five members of the Stokes family near Thomaston.
 
See what they found Inside this Beast!!
 
1000lb Alligator
 
Mandy Stokes, husband John Stokes, brother-in-law Kevin Jenkins and his children Savannah, 16, and Parker, 14, pose alongside the 15-feet long and 1,011.5 pound alligator they captured on the weekend

It took the family, consisting of Mandy Stokes, husband John Stokes, brother-in-law Kevin Jenkins and his children Savannah, 16, and Parker, 14, ten hours to capture the monster.
 
Hunters in Alabama snared an alligator weighing more than 1,000 pounds, the largest ever caught in a legal hunt in the state, conservation officials said on Monday.

The alligator, caught with a snare hook in a southern Alabama state park early Saturday, was so heavy it required a backhoe to hoist it onto a scale, said Mike Sievering, a state wildlife biologist who supervised the hunt.

"He was an eyeful, I’ll say that," Sievering said.

The alligator, which weighed 1,011.5 pounds and measured 15 feet long, was more than 100 pounds heavier than the previous state record holder, he said.

Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries biologists were able to measure the alligator, but weighing it posed a challenge. The first attempt completely destroyed a winch assembly used to hoist most average gators. So they had to use a backhoe to lift the animal.

The alligator is the largest ever legally killed by an Alabama hunter. It was caught by Mandy and John Stokes, Kevin Jenkins and his children, 16-year-old Savannah and 14-year-old Parker

Alabama began allowing alligator hunts in 2011, responding in part to the reptiles showing up unbidden in fish farm ponds, Sievering said.

In Sievering’s three-county area, up to 50 alligators are legally hunted over two weekends each summer by hook and line and underwater bow and arrow.

The American alligator was listed as endangered by the United States in 1967 after its ranks were diminished by habitat loss and excessive hunting.

But the species was removed from the list 20 years later and now numbers more than a million in the southeastern United States, according to the National Parks Conservation Association.

 

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